Got the blues? If not, we can help.

Amsonia (aka: bluestar) are one of the best temperate genera (18 species) of blue-flowered perennials for the spring garden. We've offered quite a few different species and selections through the years, rotating them in and out as propagation successes allow and as sales dictate. All but two of the species, (Amsonia orientalis from Europe and Amsonia elliptica from Asia) are North American natives. Most are extremely drought tolerant, while others like Amsonia rigida and Amsonia tabernaemontana can tolerate very wet soils. Amsonia montana is a commonly grown plant of mystery, having just appeared in horticulture, but never been documented from a wild population. A few of the amsonia species have flowers so pale blue that they appear white in the garden with only a hint of blue on the flower corolla. Amsonia are quite promiscuous in the garden, so if you grow more than one species nearby, you will have hybrids from seed. We hope you'll explore this amazing genus of perennials. Amsonia Read more [...]

Done goneii or Gone dunnii?

Amorphophallus dunnii has long been one of the stars of the winter-hardy love lily clan, but now we've gone and really "dun" something even more odd. Amorphophallus dunnii is in flower right now in the garden with it's typical 1' tall peculiar, but fragrantless flower spike. This year for the first time, our collection of Amorphophallus dunnii from Lai Chau in North Vietnam flowered, and we were thrilled to measure it at just over 3' tall. The super-sized petiole and leaf last summer gave us a hint of what was to come. Evidently plants from this region in North Vietnam are dramatically taller than those of the same species from mainland China. We are now working to vegetatively propagate this special form so that we can share it in the future. Amorphophallus dunniiAmorphophallus dunnii 'Lai Chau' foliageAmorphophallus dunnii 'Lai Chau' inflorescence Read more [...]

Who needs Viagra when you’re Soo hot?

Last week, I was innocently feeling up the spadix on our flowering Sauromatum, when I noticed it was incredibly hot...not in the biblical sense, you understand. We grabbed our new Covid thermometer to take its temperature, and with an ambient outdoor temperature of 61 degrees F, our Sauromatum spadix registered 96.3 F....that's a 35 degree F fever! In the plant world, this "fever" is known as thermogenesis. Pretend you're a plant, and a pretty homely one at that. You're ready for the big once-a-year moment and are probably wondering if you'll get lucky in the short time window that your sexual parts will be functional. You also know you were born with an aphrodisiac to help you get laid, but it's only good if you can get the word out. That's where thermogenesis comes in handy. Many members of the aroid family (think anthurium and philodendron) were born with the ability to crank up the temperature in their sexual regions to disperse the fragrance of their aphrodisiac. In the case Read more [...]

Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda Bought a Sedge

Back in 2004, I was botanizing in rural Bienville Parish, Louisiana, where I ran across this fascinating narrow-leaf native sedge, a small piece of which returned home for trials. After six years of trialing, we named it Carex retroflexa 'Bonnie and Clyde' (alluding to the location where the famous pair met their demise) and added it to our catalog offerings, where it sold a whopping 150 plants over a four year span, ending in 2013. The term "whopping" is used here as a point of sarcastical understatement. Not wanting to discard all of the unsold plants, we planted them around our new patio, where they were interspersed with Heuchera 'Smoke and Mirrors' and Penstemon 'Blackbeard'. Here are a few images from that planting, taken this week. Maybe as the interest in carex increases, we can afford to offer this again. Carex retroflexa 'Bonnie and Clyde' Carex retroflexa 'Bonnie and Clyde', Heuchera 'Smoke and Mirrors', Penstemon 'Blackbeard' (background) Read more [...]

A Fairy Wing and a Prayer

Epimediums have long been a staple of the woodland perennial garden, but it wasn't until plantsmen like Darrell Probst (US) and Mikinori Ogisu (Japan) began discovering and sharing the amazing wealth of unknown Chinese fairy wing species that their popularity began to take off. It wasn't until 1998 that epimediums begin appearing in the Plant Delights catalog, because before that time, the available horticultural offerings just weren't that impressive. Plants like Epimedium x youngianum 'Niveum' are just hard to get excited about...if you've got much of a horticultural pulse. Sadly, that's still the most dominant choice at most garden retailers. Epimedium x youngianum 'Niveum' Another reason epimediums have been slow to become mainstream is the difficulty in getting good images. Because epimediums are so three-dimensional and prone to flutter in the wind, it takes quite an effort to take good images. Single flower closeups, which are much easier to take, always make me skeptical Read more [...]

How About a Skirt?

We're always on the look out for great skirts in the garden. Skirt is the garden design term we use for groundcovers, which reduce the need for mulch, while still keeping with the textural integrity of the garden design. Here are a few images of plants that we consider great skirts. Erigeron pulchellus 'Meadow Muffin' We love this US native groundcover. The foliage is great and the flowers in very early spring are superb. At our home, we used it as a skirt for Acer palmatum 'Orangeola'. Ajuga tenori 'Valfredda' One of the top ajugas ever introduced because it doesn't spread quickly or reseed. Very durable, but truly thrives in moist, compost rich soil. Here it is in flower this spring. Ajuga reptans 'Planet Zork' Another of the absolutely finest ajugas we grow. Ajuga 'Planet Zork' is a crinkled leaf sport of Ajuga 'Burgundy Glow', which is a miserable performer in our climate, but this sport is indestructible. It's so mutated that we've never seen a flower, but who Read more [...]

Do You Remember Ginger?

There are lots of different gingers to keep straight, starting with a memorable one that was a part of the band of misfits stranded on Gilligan's Island. Horticulturally speaking, however, ginger refers both to a group of plants in the Zingiberaceae and Aristolochiaceae (birthwort) families. Hardy members of the Zingiber family are plants who mostly flower in the heat of summer, while the wild gingers (asarum) of the birthwort family tend to be mostly winter/spring flowering. So, while it's late winter/early spring, let's focus of the woodland perennial genus asarum, of which we currently grow 86 of the known 177 asarum species/subspecies. In late winter/early spring, we like to remove any of the winter damaged evergreen leaves, which makes the floral show so much more visible. Few people take time to bend down and observe their amazing flowers, so below are some of floral photos we took this spring. View our full photo gallery here. Asarum arifolium (Native: SE US) Asarum Read more [...]

A Concrete Idea

Unless you've been hiding under a piece of concrete, you've no doubt heard of our crevice garden experiment, constructed with recycled concrete and plants planted in chipped slate (Permatill). It's been just over three years since we started the project and just over a year since its completion. In all, the crevice garden spans 300' linear feet and is built with 200 tons of recycled concrete. The garden has allowed us to grow a range of dryland (6-12" of rain annually) plants that would otherwise be ungrowable in our climate which averages 45" of rain annually. One of many plants we'd killed several times ptc (prior to crevice) are the arilbred iris, known to iris folks as ab's. These amazing hybrids are crosses between the dazzling middleastern desert species and bearded hybrids. Being ready to try again post crevice (pc), we sent in our order to a California iris breeder, who promptly emailed to tell us that he would not sell them to us because they were ungrowable here. Read more [...]

Brexit Redux – Part V (final)

Our final stop was about 5.5 hours north of Tregrehan, when we had the honor to visit Kerley and Co. I didn't actually make the connection when this was first mentioned to me, but when owner David Kerley mentioned us seeing his primrose breeding, it clicked that this was the home of the amazing Belarina primroses that perform so well in our hot, humid summers. Kerleys' is not open to the public and they do not sell plants. They breed the plants and then license their genetics for sale. Breeding Trials Both Hans and I were duly blown away during our tour with David's son, Tim. Primula are one of several crops bred by the Kerley's. In their primula program, the Kerley's focus on better vigor and branching, unlike what has been done with the inexpensive common annual primroses. They do so by going back to some of the older varieties that had better perennialization and branching qualities, and then working to upgrade the flowers without losing the vigor. So far, all of the Read more [...]

Brexit Redux – Part IV

Our next focus was to re-purchase plants that we had picked up on our 2018 trip, but due to a bureaucratic shipping snafu, the majority of the 2018 shipment was killed during a six-week delay in transit. These pick-up stops included a couple of personal favorite nurseries, Cotswold Garden Flowers and Pan-Global Plants, as we worked our way south. One new stop was in Devon, at a wholesale woody plant propagator, Roundabarrow Farms, whose owner Paul Adcock had visited PDN/JLBG the year prior. Although Paul had no electricity at his remote nursery location, he was kind enough to allow us to use his open potting shed for our bare-rooting chores. For those who have never shipped plants internationally, the process is at best arduous. First, you must check the extensive USDA list to see which plants are allowed entry into the US. Next, plants must be bare-rooted and scrubbed free of all soil and potential pests. For a shipment of 100+ plants, this operation takes about 8 hours. This was Read more [...]