Mad About xMangave!

The genus xmangave is an exotic botanical curiosity that was derived from a cross between a succulent agave and a manfreda. Crosses between two genera are somewhat rare in cultivation and extremely rare in nature. However, agave and manfreda have broken all the rules and 'hooked up' on more than one occasion to produce the attractive offspring called x Mangave. The 'x' on the left side of Mangave tells you that it is a cross between different genera. xMangave 'Blue Mammoth' Both parents contribute drought-tolerance and an aversion to winter moisture. Keep your x Mangave roots dry in winter to prevent rot. We like them in containers. We have been busy making new x Mangave hybrids...so check back for updates!  xMangave also make great container specimen. Read more [...]

A Little Garden Voodoo Going On

Amorphophallus are exotic plants in the aroid family, famous for their bizarre flowers and whose odor leaves no doubt as to why they are also called corpse flower or Voodoo lily. Some varieties are tropical, while others are perennial in temperate zones. Here are some images of hardy amorphophallus in the garden. Amorphophallus bulbifer Amorphophallus henryi with purple stems Amorphophallus konjac Read more [...]

Thinking Inside the Pot

Container gardening allows anyone to enjoy flowers and their beauty even if you live in an apartment, town home, or have very little usable land for planting. Select plants that similar water and light requirements. Select plants with various flower and leaf color, bloom time, height and texture. Sunny tropical plant selection. A general rule of thumb when designing a container is to include a thriller, fillers, and spillers. The thriller is the focal point of the container (and yes you can have more than one thriller), the filler compliments the thriller and helps fill in space in the container, and spillers flow over the edge of the container and add another contrasting design element. Thrillers Fillers More fillers and spillers. Finished container. Read more [...]

False Red Yucca

True, not all false red yuccas are red! Arizona Sunrise The genus Hesperaloe is a small genus of just 7 species that are related to aloe, yucca, and agave. All 7 species of hesperaloe are native to the Chihuahuan desert in the southern US and the area around Coahuila in northern Mexico. The "red" part of red yucca is the flowers that appear on spikes held well above the foliage during summer. Hesperaloe flowers are tubular too, just the way hummingbirds like them. Unlike agave and yucca, hesperaloe leaves do not have spines and are better for tight spaces or gardens that have children and pets running through them. Hesperaloe clumps are packed densely with narrow leaves and from a distance look like ornamental grass. As with all desert plants, hesperaloe must have full sun and excellent drainage, especially in winter, to prevent root rot. They are also salt tolerant plants. Try pairing hesperaloe with other drought-tolerant colorful plants such as alstroemeria, crocosmia, Read more [...]

Catch the Flame

Cercis 'Flame Thrower' - from the breeding work of Dennis Werner You don't want to miss the first annual Southeastern Plant Symposium, Friday, June 7 and Saturday, June 8. Hosted by the JC Raulston Arboretum and Juniper Level Botanic Garden, this symposium caters to plant nerds from across the region and beyond. We are bringing in some of the best of the best to talk about cutting edge horticulture. We have plant explorers, plant breeders, nurserymen, and other experts for a two-day, plantaholic binge. This will also be a great opportunity to get your hands on some really rare, new, and very choice plants. Read more [...]

A new redbud to cultivation

Since redbuds were a favorite plant of the late J.C. Raulston, and a feature of the garden that bears his name, I assumed that I had seen or grown all of the known species. Boy was I wrong, as I learned from Scott McMahon, Manager of International Plant Explorations for the Atlanta Botanical Garden on a recent trip to Georgia. Cercis chuniana, which Scott brought in from China, is one of two species of redbuds with pendant racemes of flowers. The other is Cercis racemosa, which we've grown in our gardens since 1995. The foliage of C. chuniana is glaucous and quite unique, along with the flowers emerge white and age to pink. We look forward to this amazing new plant eventually becoming available to the public. Read more [...]

Do You Know Your Neighbors

There are many great garden-worthy native plants that are under utilized, not readily available, or not even on the radar of many gardeners. If you aren't familiar with, or haven't grown these native beauties, you should get acquainted! Erigeron is native to all states East of the Mississippi and forms flat evergreen rosettes that are slowly stoloniferous and form a tight mat. In spring, the rosettes are topped with 10" stalks of light pink daisies. Average-to-dry garden soils in light shade is perfect. Erigeron pulchellus 'Meadow Muffin' Carex radiata is found in eastern North America from Canada to Alabama. 'Halifax' is a fine-textured selection we encountered while hiking in Halifax Co., NC. The evergreen 8" x 8" mound is a stunning textural addition to the woodland garden and is a great contrast to bold textured woodland plants such as hostas and hellebores. Carex radiata 'Halifax' Engelmannia peristenia is a monotypic genus (only one species) that has proven ridiculously Read more [...]

Hardy Agave for Your Garden

There are many agave that are hardy in our Zone 7b garden that many people would not think would live here. The key to successfully growing agaves is proper siting, planting, and culture. These are pictures taken this week of agaves in the garden. Join us May 4, 2019 at 2:00pm for our Gardening Unplugged garden chat on Hardy Agave for the Garden, during our Spring Open Nursery & Garden Days. Agave ovatifolia 'Vanzie' Agave lophantha 'Splendida' Agave salmiana 'Green Goblet' Agave victoria-reginae Papay Giant form Agave x pseudoferox Read more [...]

Spring Open Nursery & Garden is Just Around the Corner

It's hard to believe that spring open nursery and garden days is almost here. Spring is always a busy time of year and our nursery and garden staff have been working tirelessly making sure the gardens are in prime condition and our sales houses are brimming with beautiful plants. Take advantage of shopping our sales houses for many unique and rare perennials, many exclusively available at Plant Delights Nursery. We are offering nearly 20 varieties of Baptisia this year, more than you will find at most garden centers. Many are from our own breeding program at Juniper Level Botanic Garden and include two 2019 introductions you will find no where else. Join Tony, Friday, May 3 at 10am for a stroll through the gardens as he discusses baptisias, part of our Gardening Unplugged garden chat series. Baptisia Bletilla - Hardy Orchids The hardy orchids also look amazing this year, with seven different bletilla and over 30 varieties of ladyslippers and calanthe available, you are sure Read more [...]

Seeds of Change

At Plant Delights Nursery and Juniper Level Botanic Garden we grow a number of our plants from seed. While many plants will come pretty true to type from seed, there is always the element of genetics and genetic diversity, just as in humans. We are always on the look out for these genetic variations and the next great garden worth plant. Below is a planting of 3 Alyssum argenteum that were grown from seed received from Jelitto Perennial Seed. All planted at the same time and same conditions, side by side, you can see the plant to the far left is already in flower, the middle plant is just starting to bud, and the far right is denser and more compact in its growth habit. Alyssum argenteum - Jelitto form Below is another seed grown crop of Alyssum saxatile 'Sulphureum' and you can see the variation of flower color from a creamy, buttery yellow to a bright golden yellow. So we are always excited about growing crops from seed and discovering the variations nature has in store. Alyssum Read more [...]