Rain, followed by Rain Lilies

Our nearly 2" rain, a few days ago, produced a stunning show of rain lilies in the garden.  Here are some selections from the original Yucca Do collection in Labuffa, Mexico. Between July and October, these flower 2-3 days after each rain. Winter hardiness of each is Zone 7b, although, they may possibly survive in Zone 7a.  They also make fabulous container specimens. Zephyranthes 'Early and Often' (a Yucca Do selection) Zephyranthes 'Lily Pies' (a Yucca Do selection)  Zephyranthes 'Rose Colored Glasses' (a Yucca Do selection) Zephyranthes 'Star Spangled' (a Yucca Do selection) Zephyranthes 'Viva Las Vegas' (a Plant Delights selection for 2018 release) Read more [...]

Hymen Flowers

Hymen flowers (aka Hymenocallis) are still going, as the Northern Mexican species now perfume the garden. The genus begins flowering in spring, and if you grow a wide range of species, you can have flowers until late summer/early fall. Here's a photo we recently took of Hymenocallis pimana in the garden.  While many hymenocallis prefer very moist soils, we grow this in a dry bed with agaves and cactus.  Starting in early evening, the flowers emit a honeysuckle-like fragrant to lure evening moths for reproductive activities. While we also like the more commonly sold Dutch hybrids, which are actually intergeneric crosses with the South American Ismene, we think the North American native species are far superior as garden plants, so we've always wondered why these don't sell nearly as well as they should.  Read more [...]

Hardy Orchids from seed

I was looking at our patch of Bletilla 'Brigantes'...a hardy orchid hybrid between Bletilla striata and Bletilla ochracea and wondering what its offspring would look like.  I recalled that the late plantsman Don Jacobs grew bletillas from seed in his window sill, so I figured we'd give it a try.  If you've never handled orchid seed, it's a bit like handling tiny dust particles.  We harvested the seed before the pods cracked open and sowed them like we do our fern spores, and sealed them in a ziploc bag.  Sure enough, they germinated, and two years later actually flowered.  These are a sampling of the amazing variation from the 200 seedlings we potted.  We'll select a good representative sample of the variation including any unique individuals and plant them out in trial beds and watch how they develop.  How exciting! Read more [...]

Final Summer Open Nursery and Garden Weekend

We hope you’ll be able to visit during our final open weekend for summer, Saturday July 15 (8-5) and Sunday July 16 (1-5).  The gardens are looking quite fabulous, especially our new crevice garden.  The greenhouses are also quite full of an assortment of perennial treasures!

Another possibly new elephant ear

Here’s another new elephant ear we’re thinking about introducing, but we’d love to hear your thoughts.  Mature height is 3-4′ and it does spread among other plants. We are calling it Colocasia ‘Smiley Face’. This is an unidentified species, probably from North Vietnam, that has been hardy for us for over a decade.  Thoughts?

New Elephant Ear

Here’s a new image of Colocasia ‘Aloha’ growing in our garden.  This 2017 introduction from the breeding work of Dr. John Cho is truly amazing and so unique. This plant is 8 weeks in the ground from a 1 quart pot.

Agave Mountain Man – the big moment

We posted this a few weeks ago as our Agave 'Mountain Man' (A. gentryi x montana) prepared to open. We'll, the big moment is here...below are a few shot from today. The seed were wild-collected in Mexico in the late 1990s by our friends at Yucca Do, and our seedling was planted in May 2000, so it took 17 years to flower.  Fingers crossed for good seed set, and fortunately we have many more agaves in flower (and a tall ladder) to help the process.  Read more [...]

Reproduction in the Garden today

From the flora side of the garden, the lovely sacred lily, Rohdea japonica is flowering today.  Our bet is that many folks have never slowed down long enough to actually see a rohdea flower, but if you look close, you’ll see the pollen is ready for hybridizing.

Representing the garden fauna, we are loaded to gills will Kildeer this year.  One nest of five has already hatched and squawking incessantly, but two more mothers including this one have a secure space in our parking lot.  Of course, our fox family has also been keeping a close eye out for the blessed event.

 

Ark, Ark…is that rain we hear?

In a matter of two days, most of our region went from abnormally dry to saturated, when an unusual weather system tracked across our area.  Not to worry...we've loaded two each of every plant on the green arc for safe keeping. We tallied 5.5" of rain at the nursery, while areas a few miles away registered almost 9 inches.  As you've no doubt seen on the news, areas in and around creeks and rivers are underwater.  Fortunately, we're fine as all our time spent on water management preparation paid dividends.   The gardens looks absolutely fabulous, so we hope to see you at our 2017 Spring Open Nursery and Garden which starts today (Friday).  We've prepared a special display of the new xMangaves (agave x manfreda hybrids) on the deck area, so we hope you'll stop by and check out this amazing new category of drought-tolerant succulents for both containers and the garden.  See you soon! Read more [...]

A View from the top – Agave flowering soon

Look what showed up in the garden.  Our specimen of Agave ‘Mountain Man’…a hybrid of Agave montana and Agave gentryi decidied to flower for our spring open nursery and garden.  This unusual hybrid starts its flower spike in the fall, which stops for the coldest part of winter, then starts growing again in spring.  The spike showed no damage despite a winter low of 13 degrees F.  Be sure to check this out when you visit…located just behind the welcome tent.