Brexit Redux – Part V (final)

Our final stop was about 5.5 hours north of Tregrehan, when we had the honor to visit Kerley and Co. I didn't actually make the connection when this was first mentioned to me, but when owner David Kerley mentioned us seeing his primrose breeding, it clicked that this was the home of the amazing Belarina primroses that perform so well in our hot, humid summers. Kerleys' is not open to the public and they do not sell plants. They breed the plants and then license their genetics for sale. Breeding Trials Both Hans and I were duly blown away during our tour with David's son, Tim. Primula are one of several crops bred by the Kerley's. In their primula program, the Kerley's focus on better vigor and branching, unlike what has been done with the inexpensive common annual primroses. They do so by going back to some of the older varieties that had better perennialization and branching qualities, and then working to upgrade the flowers without losing the vigor. So far, all of the Read more [...]

Brexit Redux – Part I

With the ink barely dry on the Brexit signing in early February, and well before Coronavirus panic hit, it was time for a return trip to the UK for another round of plant collecting. Accompanying me is Walters Gardens plant breeder, Hans Hansen of Michigan. Who knows how much more difficult it might become to get plants from across the pond into the US in the future. In reality, it's pretty darn difficult even now. Our trip started with a return to John Massey's Ashwood Nursery, which is widely regarded as home to the top hellebore and hepatica breeding programs in the world. Although I'd been several times, I'd never managed to catch the hellebores in flower, and although it's hard to predict bloom timing, we arrived at the beginning of peak bloom. We were able to visit the private stock greenhouses, where the breeding plants are housed, and what amazing specimens we saw. Below are the latest selections of Helleborus x hybridus from the handiwork of long-time Ashwood breeder, Kevin Read more [...]

For the Love of Hostas

Hostas are incredibly tough plants and will get along fine in almost any garden...but they look their absolute best with just a little extra attention. Here are some tips to grow beautiful hostas in your garden. Despite hostas durable nature, there are many myths circulating about growing hostas, one of which is the term Originator's Stock. Originator's stock is simply a superfluous term for saying that the plant in question is the correctly named clone. Click here for more debunking! Read more [...]

Cold Hardy Palms of the Carolinas

Did you know that North Carolina has twice as many native palms as California? Join garden volunteer, Mike Papay, on a virtual tour of Juniper Level Botanic Garden as he discusses native and cold hardy palms of the Carolinas as part of our Gardening Unplugged garden chat series, held each day of our Open Nursery & Garden Days. Windmill Palm - Trachycarpus Read more [...]

Agave x striphantha

When creating hybrids, especially with plants like agaves, it takes many years to know exactly what the offspring will look like. We have a pretty good guess, since we've done this for so long, but here's an updated photo of a cross we made in 2013 of Agave striata x Agave lophantha. The hybrid, that we call Agave x striphantha is now 3' wide, which is the same width of the Agave striata parent. We expected the hybrid to stay a bit smaller, but it did not. What we still don't know is what will happen when it flowers. Agave striata is the only hardy species that doesn't die after flowering, while the flowering rosette of the other parent, Agave lophantha cashes it in after its sexual encounter. Hopefully, it won't be long before we know about the hybrid, and hopefully it will produce viable seed. Learn more about growing agaves. Agave x striphantha (striata x lophantha) This is the Agave striata parent This is the Agave lophantha parent. Read more [...]

Falling Waters in the Garden

Here's a new photo we just took in the garden that showcases the amazing architecture of xMangave 'Falling Waters' when it reaches maturity...pretty amazing! Find out more about xMangave and their uses as a container specimen on FaceBook @MadAboutMangave. xMangave 'Falling Waters' The genus xmangave is an exotic botanical curiosity that was derived from a cross between an agave and a manfreda. Crosses between two genera are somewhat rare in cultivation and extremely rare in nature. However, agave and manfreda have broken all the rules and 'hooked up' on more than one occasion to produce the attractive offspring called x Mangave. The 'x' on the left side of Mangave tells you that it is a cross between different genera. Read more [...]

Cyclamens in the cracks

When we completed our crevice garden, we wanted to see if it would be a good home to cyclamen, since they like to grow naturally in well drained sites, and sites that are very dry during their late spring/early dormant period. Here, they also get a couple of hours of morning sun, but shade after that and no supplemental water. The soil mix is about 50% Permatill and 50% native soil/compost. Here are some photos recently taken this winter showing how they have fared. The joy of growing cyclamen is that each seedling has a different leaf pattern...what amazing plants! Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen coum Cyclamen coum Read more [...]

Late Fall Alliums

Although it's a bit late, we wanted to share a new image we took of Allium kiiense in the gardens last fall. For us, this is one of the best small alliums for the garden, but because it flowers so late in the year (2nd week of November for us), few people ever see it. Every year, we produce more than we can sell because we keep assuming that word of this treasure will finally get out in public. Since it has a slightly pendant habit, Allium kiiense is best located where you can see it close up, and ideally from slightly below. Read more [...]

Winter Bloomers

Walking around the garden in mid-winter, we spotted a couple of nice woodies in full flower in addition to the winter blooming perennials. The first is one of many witch hazels we grow...in this case, Hamamelis 'Orange Peel'. Hamamelis 'Orange Peel' Growing nearby is Distylium buxifolium, also in full flower. D. buxifolium is a cousin to the better known D. myricoides. As best we can determine, it was not in cultivation in the US until a recent wild seed collection by Scott McMahan of the Atlanta Botanical Garden. Our plant is 3 years old from seed and measures 3' tall x 10' wide. Distylium buxifolium in flower Distylium buxifolium flowers closeup Read more [...]

Asarum – Wild Gingers

Plants in the genus asarum are small but exquisite, deer-resistant woodland perennials that thrive in moist but well-drained conditions with light shade. Many asarum species are evergreen and make a great ground cover in the woodland garden. Here are some images of asarum in the garden this morning. Asarum are one of our specialty collections at Juniper Level Botanic Garden, with 86 species and 529 unique clones. Join Tony in the gardens during this Gardening Unplugged video garden chat about wild gingers. The flower color of asarums are usually burgundy or purple, but we are always on the look out for variants. Towards the end of the video Tony shows a yellow flowered form, Asarum ichangense 'Ichang Lemon', which we hope to have available for 2021. We do have another yellow flowered form we are offering for the first time this year, Asarum 'Tama Rasya'. Asarum 'Tama Rasya' Read more [...]