Growing Pitcher Plants in Containers

picture of pitcher plant grown in a container

Container grown Sarracenia ‘Hurricane Creek White’

In early summer of 2016, after my first couple of months working at Plant Delights Nursery, I bought my first pitcher plant, Sarracenia ‘Hurricane Creek White’. After reading the article Introduction to Sarracenia – The Carnivorous Pitcher Plant on PDN’s website, I followed the simple instructions on growing pitcher plants in containers.

I selected a decorative frost proof container that was equivalent to, or maybe a little larger than a 3gal container. I used sphagnum peat moss, as recommended, for the potting mix. The sphagnum peat moss is very dry and almost powdery when it comes out of the bag. Put the peat moss in a bucket and add water. Mix well, and allow the peat to soak up the water until it is no longer powdery and is more a spongy consistency.

Now you are ready to plant. I started off with one of our 3.5″ pitcher plants, which had one to two growing points and four to six pitchers, much like the plant pictured here.

picture of 3.5" pitcher plant

3.5″ container of Sarracenia ‘Hurricane Creek White’

Fill your decorative container about 2/3rd full with the moistened peat, gently break apart the root ball of the 3.5″ plant and spread the roots out on top of the peat and cover the roots with more moistened peat and firm up to stabilize the plant. I also incorporated a couple of small venus fly traps in the container. Place the container in a plastic tray that will hold water, so the peat can draw the water up from the base and not dry out. 

The container stays on our outdoor patio where it gets light morning shade and afternoon sun. It continued to grow the rest of the summer and remained outdoors all winter long. I trimmed off the old pitchers this spring as it began to flush. The first picture in this post is what it looks like today, one year later, easily tripled in size.

This was an easy project and a great and rewarding experience for my introduction to growing pitcher plants, not to mention the attention it garnered from friends who came over. I have now started my second container for the patio utilizing ‘Carolina Yellow Jacket’.

picture of potted Carolina Yellow Jacket pitcher plant

Recently potted Carolina Yellow Jacket pitcher plant

 

3 thoughts on “Growing Pitcher Plants in Containers

  1. “Feet wet and crown dry”. You can mix up to 1/3 sand to weight the pot. Sunlight essential. No added fertilizer.

  2. I like the idea of having pitcher plants in a container but I’m concerned about standing water. What do you do to mitigate mosquitos or any other pests?

    • There are mosquito dunks (or granules) that contain the insecticide Bt. Bt kills mosquitoes without harming non-target species like butterflies, frogs, puppy dogs, little kids, and etc. They can be found at any good garden center or online.

      For more information about sarracenia, check out our in-depth article here.

Leave a Reply to Richard Hickenbotham Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *