Surprise….it’s surprise lily time!

Many gardeners don't look forward to summer, but we've found a cure...plant lycoris! Known as surprise lilies and hurricane lilies, the lycoris bloom season starts in mid-July and continues into mid-September with a procession of different varieties.  Winter hardiness of lycoris ranges from Zone 4 to Zone 7, depending on when the foliage emerges. We currently grow nearly 600 different varieties of lycoris, the diversity of which is truly astonishing. Because we are the only source of most of these, once they are sold out, we may not have enough to offer again for 5-10 years, so if you see something you like, it's best not to wait.  You can plant lycoris anytime the ground isn't frozen.     Lycoris x squamigera is an old hybrid, grown throughout the midwest, often mistakenly purchased as the tender Amaryllis belladonna. Lycoris 'Caldwell's White' is a surprise lily we recently released from the late, famed lycoris breeder, Sam Caldwell. We can't say enough Read more [...]

We’re looking for a few good…make that, excellent, staff additions

We’re currently accepting application for two key positions, Nursery/Greenhouse Grower and Nursery Manager.  We’re looking for just the right person who shares our passion for plants, people, and high quality.  You can find out more on our website, so if you’d like to join our team, let us hear from you. 

More highlights from Denver

Kelly Grummons is a long-time cactiphyle and cactus breeder.  Kelly was a part of Timberline Gardens in Denver until it closed recently to make way for development.  For now, he's running his mail order cactus nursery from his home.  Many of the cool opuntias in our garden came from Kelly.  Kelly's home garden More cool plants I don't normally look at turf in a plantsman's garden, but I was struck by his beautiful lawn....and without irrigation.  Several decades ago, this bermudagrass hybrid, Cynodon dactylon x Cynodon transvaalensis was discovered in a Denver garden, brought into the US over fifty years ago, by a worker stationed in Africa.  Recently introduced as DogTuff grass, it thrives, once established, without irrigation in the high mountain deserts of Denver.  Additionally, the spread rate is dramatically less than the more invasive bermudagrass of which most gardeners hate.  The hybrid is sterile, so must be planted Read more [...]

On the road, again

Just back from the Perennial Plant Association Symposium, held this year in Denver. The annual meeting, designed for garden professionals, includes plenty of tours and talks.  The meeting attracts garden designers, garden workers, garden writers & speakers, nursery growers, retailers, and perennial plant lovers from around the world. It's a great chance to meet and chat with just about anyone you've ever heard, who works with perennials.  (Front, right with the backpack is Joseph Tychonievich, who wrote the new book, Rock Gardening; Reimagining a Classic Style.  Did I mention that next years' PPA will be in Raleigh/Durham, NC from July 30-August 3.  I'm sure you don't want to miss such an amazing opportunity!  The amazing Denver Botanic Garden was our dinner site, what an amazing place to stroll and learn. Denver Botanic Garden is one of the premier gardens in the US, combining incredible design with an incomparable collection of rare and little-known Read more [...]

Hardy Cactus…thoughts

We've got a thing for hardy cactus in the garden, but haven't propagated many to offer yet. One of our many favorites is Notocactus apricus.  Above is our 17 year old clump in the garden, which is 4" tall x 15" wide.  We've grown a few from seed, but are curious how many folks might consider purchasing one?  We've only been to 7F since 2000, so we don't know if it will take colder temperatures or not.   Visitors to our spring Open Nursery and Garden this year got to see the amazing Trichocereus 'Irridescent Watermelon' (bred by local cacti specialist, Mike Papay) in full flower (hardy so far to 7 degrees F).  Offsets are almost non-existent, so we decided to grow some from seed. Each plant will be different, but all should be quite nice.  So, if we offered these as a seed strain, would you purchase some, knowing each will be slightly different? Read more [...]

Rain, followed by Rain Lilies

Our nearly 2" rain, a few days ago, produced a stunning show of rain lilies in the garden.  Here are some selections from the original Yucca Do collection in Labuffa, Mexico. Between July and October, these flower 2-3 days after each rain. Winter hardiness of each is Zone 7b, although, they may possibly survive in Zone 7a.  They also make fabulous container specimens. Zephyranthes 'Early and Often' (a Yucca Do selection) Zephyranthes 'Lily Pies' (a Yucca Do selection)  Zephyranthes 'Rose Colored Glasses' (a Yucca Do selection) Zephyranthes 'Star Spangled' (a Yucca Do selection) Zephyranthes 'Viva Las Vegas' (a Plant Delights selection for 2018 release) Read more [...]

Hymen Flowers

Hymen flowers (aka Hymenocallis) are still going, as the Northern Mexican species now perfume the garden. The genus begins flowering in spring, and if you grow a wide range of species, you can have flowers until late summer/early fall. Here's a photo we recently took of Hymenocallis pimana in the garden.  While many hymenocallis prefer very moist soils, we grow this in a dry bed with agaves and cactus.  Starting in early evening, the flowers emit a honeysuckle-like fragrant to lure evening moths for reproductive activities. While we also like the more commonly sold Dutch hybrids, which are actually intergeneric crosses with the South American Ismene, we think the North American native species are far superior as garden plants, so we've always wondered why these don't sell nearly as well as they should.  Read more [...]