Oh Cezanne, Don’t You Cry For Me

Ok, the spelling of “Susanna” is slightly different, but don’t let that deter you from growing one of the greatest groundcover clematis that we’ve ever grown. Yes, that’s right…no mailbox post or staking required. We’ve been growing this amazing, compact clematis as a groundcover for years and it is truly superb. Here it is in the garden this spring, but it will also continue to flower into summer. What’s not to love about Cezanne!

How About a Skirt?

We're always on the look out for great skirts in the garden. Skirt is the garden design term we use for groundcovers, which reduce the need for mulch, while still keeping with the textural integrity of the garden design. Here are a few images of plants that we consider great skirts. Erigeron pulchellus 'Meadow Muffin' We love this US native groundcover. The foliage is great and the flowers in very early spring are superb. At our home, we used it as a skirt for Acer palmatum 'Orangeola'. Ajuga tenori 'Valfredda' One of the top ajugas ever introduced because it doesn't spread quickly or reseed. Very durable, but truly thrives in moist, compost rich soil. Here it is in flower this spring. Ajuga reptans 'Planet Zork' Another of the absolutely finest ajugas we grow. Ajuga 'Planet Zork' is a crinkled leaf sport of Ajuga 'Burgundy Glow', which is a miserable performer in our climate, but this sport is indestructible. It's so mutated that we've never seen a flower, but who Read more [...]

Do You Remember Ginger?

There are lots of different gingers to keep straight, starting with a memorable one that was a part of the band of misfits stranded on Gilligan's Island. Horticulturally speaking, however, ginger refers both to a group of plants in the Zingiberaceae and Aristolochiaceae (birthwort) families. Hardy members of the Zingiber family are plants who mostly flower in the heat of summer, while the wild gingers (asarum) of the birthwort family tend to be mostly winter/spring flowering. So, while it's late winter/early spring, let's focus of the woodland perennial genus asarum, of which we currently grow 86 of the known 177 asarum species/subspecies. In late winter/early spring, we like to remove any of the winter damaged evergreen leaves, which makes the floral show so much more visible. Few people take time to bend down and observe their amazing flowers, so below are some of floral photos we took this spring. View our full photo gallery here. Asarum arifolium (Native: SE US) Asarum Read more [...]

Falling for selaginella

We have long loved the amazing selaginellas, but in the fall and winter, the evergreen native Selaginella apoda looks absolutely fabulous. Here it is in the garden, 1st image is in November, 2nd image February, carpeting the ground with a touch-worthy texture.  It's only been known since 1753...surely you've managed to grow one by now!

 

If you're looking for something taller, the Chinese Selaginella braunii also looks great in the fall and tops out around 1' tall.

A few years ago, we were browsing in one of the box stores, and spotted this variegated Selaginella braunii, which came home with us. So far, we haven't been able to get the variegation to be stable enough to offer.  Read more [...]