Plant Delights April 2015 Newsletter

Greetings PDNers! Nursery Update—Made it through Winter It's been quite a late winter at Juniper Level/Plant Delights, with the latest-occurring single digit temperature we've seen since our records began in the 1970s. Plants like hellebores in bloom when the cold snap hit have recovered, although flowers that were fully open or nearly so were slightly damaged. Hellebores are really tough and, after removing a few damaged flowers, they look great. Plants and More Plants Some of the very early trilliums, like the Florida forms of Trillium underwoodii, were also damaged. On a few of these, the entire stem collapsed back to the rhizome. When this happens, these trilliums will not return until next year. All of the other trillium species had the good sense to wait until later to emerge and are unscathed. One of the benefits of cold winters is a good chilling period for most perennials. Like a bear needs to hibernate, the same is true for most perennials and the Read more [...]

Phlox ‘Barthirtythree’ aka Purple Eye Flame

One of the reason we are so passionate about plant trialing is that we can avoid offering plants like this phlox.  This is Purple Eye Flame phlox taken in our gardens this week, part of the Bar Series from the Netherlands.  While many of the phlox from this "disease resistant" series are excellent, others leave a bit to be desired when it comes to things like mildew resistance.  Often these plants perform well in the breeders' climate, but not so well in other parts of the world.  While it will never be possible to adequate trial all plants in each ecological region, more trials are always better than less. Read more [...]

Ozarks continued – Phlox world

Phlox divaricata stop 1 AR

I’ve never encountered the likes of phlox like we saw in the Ozarks.  Our first stop had three species of phlox growing together in a flood plain, Phlox paniculata, Phlox divaricata, and Phlox pilosa…which doesn’t look anything like Phlox pilosa I’ve seen in other regions.  I appears that all the phlox integrade, as many plants there appeared to be hybrids among the many species.  Truly, a fascinating conundrum.

2008 Plant Delights Nursery April Newsletter

April brings the start of my two favorite seasons... baseball and gardening. With both, there is the fading of bad memories from the preceding season and a childish optimism about the upcoming year. All in all, we had a relatively mild winter with no snow and a low temperature of 14.7 degrees F. This spring has been relatively cool, which has kept plant emergence far behind 2007, and has allowed us to better weather the late spring frosts which are inevitable every year. For the first time since last spring, all of the public reservoirs around Raleigh are finally full and watering restrictions have been relaxed. Gardeners not only here, but in other areas hit with the drought in 2007 can finally begin replanting plants lost last year. Some parts of the country have had too much water, but I guess we will never be able to spread the water around more evenly. We made an interesting, but disappointing discovery this winter when we found Agave parryi 'Cream Spike' isn't nearly as hardy Read more [...]

2006 Plant Delights Nursery April Newsletter

Howdy folks, and I hope everyone is having a great spring as is the case at Juniper Level. So far, the late spring frosts haven't been too bad. We're keeping our fingers crossed that we are finished with winter, but we'll be watching the forecasts closely over the next few weeks. There is nothing more agonizing for a nursery than trying to figure out when to uncover the greenhouses in spring. If you wait too long, plants stretch and become weak. If you uncover too early, well.... you know what happens if it gets cold again. Also, if you have more rain than your quota, please send some our way. We're already six inches behind for the year since the folks in the PNW have been hoarding all the winter moisture. We've been snapping photos as fast as we can and still can't keep up. It's been a great spring for most plants in the garden, especially the arisaemas. The early-flowering A. amurense group has been stunning this year. This is also the best show we have ever had from Arisaema kishidae Read more [...]