Growing Pitcher Plants in Containers

In early summer of 2016, after my first couple of months working at Plant Delights Nursery, I bought my first pitcher plant, Sarracenia 'Hurricane Creek White'. After reading the article Introduction to Sarracenia - The Carnivorous Pitcher Plant on PDN's website, I followed the simple instructions on growing pitcher plants in containers. I selected a decorative frost proof container that was equivalent to, or maybe a little larger than a 3gal container. I used sphagnum peat moss, as recommended, for the potting mix. The sphagnum peat moss is very dry and almost powdery when it comes out of the bag. Put the peat moss in a bucket and add water. Mix well, and allow the peat to soak up the water until it is no longer powdery and is more a spongy consistency. Now you are ready to plant. I started off with one of our 3.5" pitcher plants, which had one to two growing points and four to six pitchers, much like the plant pictured here. Fill your decorative container Read more [...]

Pitcher Plants in flower…truly unique

Here are some recent images from the gardens here at Juniper Level of one of our favorite pitcher plants, Sarracenia leucophylla 'Tarnok'. This amazing double-flowered pitcher plant was discovered in Alabama by plantsman Coleman Tarnok in the early 1970s. Here is the clump growing in the garden.  Pitcher plants are quite easy to grow, provided the soil stays moist about 3-8" below the surface.  They do not, however, like soil that remains waterlogged.  In both the ground and in pots, we grow our pitcher plants in pure peat moss.  Most pitcher plants are reliably winter hardy in Zone 5.  We hope you'll give these a try in your garden.   Read more [...]

Pitcher plants in flower

Here's an image we just took in the gardens of Sarracenia leucophylla 'Sumter'.  In our opinion, it doesn't get much better than this. All hardy pitcher plants have these amazing other worldly flowers, and most are winter hardy in Zones 5 and 6.  All our sarracenias are planted in straight peat moss, about 8" deep inside a pond liner that has holes cut along the edges so the water doesn't stay too high.  No fertilizer ever and you certainly don't have to worry about insects.   Read more [...]

Garden design changes

Many of the changes you'll see when you visit the garden next time are driven by Anita's suggestions to open up many of the overgrown garden spaces around the sales area. This new section is where 150' of Nellie Stevens hollies were removed last fall/winter. Despite only being in a short while, the plants are beginning to settle in.  The wonderful rock work, was done by our Research and Grounds horticulturist, Jeremy Schmidt. Here's a fun seep area in the same space that Jeremy dreamed up.  We hope you'll check out these and more new additions when you visit during our upcoming July open nursery and garden.     Read more [...]