Fern zombies awaken in the garden

Coniogramme gracillis unfurling

Like sci-fi zombies re-awakening, ferns in the garden are spring back to life.  Nothing says spring quite like the presence of new fern fronds emerging…known as croziers.  Below are several different fern images we’ve taken as they emerged this spring.  The first is the bamboo fern, coniogramme.Lepisorus tosaensis unfurling

Lepisorus or ribbon ferns, with their long narrow fronds are quite unique.

Matteuccia The King with new and old fronds

Matteucia or ostrich fern emerges alongside last years’ spore bearing fronds providing an interesting contrast.

Onoclea sensibilis Supersize with summer and winter fronds.

Onoclea, aka sensitive fern does the same, holding both the new fronds alongside the old fertile fronds from the prior season..  Ferns like this are called dimorphic, which means they have two different frond types…fertile and non-fertile.  Most ferns pack light and have both on the same frond.Osmunda cinnamomea emerging  Osmunda cinnamomea unfurling2

The two images above are our native Osmunda cinnamomea or Cinnamon fern.  The hairy croziers are just amazing.  Recent taxonomy has actually kicked this out of the genus Osmunda and created a new genus, Osmundastrum.   Hmmm.Osmunda regalis unfurling

Here is its cousin, Osmunda regalis or royal fern…another great US native that’s also native in Europe and Asia.Polystichum acrostichoides unfurling

This is the lovely native Polystichum acrostichoides or Christmas fern…also wonderfully hairy as it emerges.Polystichum makinoi unfurling (2) Polystichum makinoi unfurling

Here are two images of the Asian tassel fern, Polystichum makinoi that we took a week apart as the croziers unfurled.Polystichum tagawanum unfurling

The lovely Asian, brown-haired  Polystichum tagawanum. Pteris vittata unfurling2

Our winter hardy form of the table fern, Pteris vittataThelypteris lindheimeri crozier

A single picture perfect crozier of the Texas native, Thelypteris lindheimeriWoodsia subcordata emerging

And finally, the dwarf Woodsia subcordata.  How can you fail to find joy in this amazing spring rebirth?  We hope you’ll visit our fern offerings and choose some of these deer resistant gems for your own garden.

Beesia – have you met yet?

Beesia calthafolia emerging2

 

Do you know beesia?  Outside of the plant collector world, few people have heard of this obscure member of the Ranunculus family…first cousin to hellebores, thalictrum, and clematis.  There are only two species, both native to moist woodland soils at high elevations in the Himalayas.  Surprisingly, Beesia calthifolia thrives in our heat and humidity almost as well as it does in the cool Pacific Northwest.  The beautiful mature foliage resembles a cross of wild ginger and galax and is about the same stature.  If you have a woodland garden in Zone 6a-8b, we hope you’ll give this a try.

Trout lilies in flower

Erythronium rostratum A2AL-065

 

Among many flowers in the garden today are the native trout lilies, Erythronium rostratum (Ohio to Texas).  This small woodland ephemeral perennial is amazing, both for its foliage and flowers.  By May, it’s gone to sleep for the summer.  We are growing these from seed, which should take 2-3 years to have flowering-size plants to share.  Would anyone purchase these if we had them available?

Aucubas in flower

Aucuba japonica male flowers - form A

 

We have a thing for aucubas that gotten well out of hand.  Of course, you could say the same for many plant groups.  I was photographing in the garden this week and snapped this photo of a male aucuba in flower.  Most people who grow aucubas often opt for females, since they produce nice red fruit, but there will usually be no fruit without a male nearby.  While I love aucuba fruit, I think the males are the most stunning.  How many shrubs do you know that flower in the winter time?  We’d love to offer more male clones if anyone would purchase them.

 

 

Boehmeria in flower

Boehmeria nipononivea Glowlight2

Boehmeria ‘Glow Light’ in our woodland garden this week..one of the few rays of brightness we’ve seen in the garden after 11 straight days and over 6″ of rain.

Boehmeria nipononivea Kogane Mushi in flower closeupHere’s a closeup of Boehmeria ‘Kogane Mushi’ in flower this week.  Although we grow boehmeria for the foliage, the flower are also quite interesting.  Most of these are Zone 6a-9b and very easy to grow in light shade or part sun.

 

Dryopteris erythrosora ‘Brilliance’

Dryopteris erythrosora BrillianceHere’s a new photo of the evergreen Autumn fern, Dryopteris erythrosora ‘Brilliance‘ as it emerges in the woodland garden with its stunning new growth.

 

Polygonatum ‘Angel Wings’ (aka: ‘Carlisle’)

Polygonatum odoratum Angel Wings

 

 

The Solomon’s Seal, Polygonatum odoratum ‘Angel Wings’ looks delicious in the garden today!  Light shade to part sun is ideal.

Iris cristata in flower

Iris cristata Montrose White

The dwarf native woodland iris, Iris cristata are in flower here today.  Iris ‘Montrose White’ was introduced by Montrose Gardens in NC.  Iris cristata is native in shade, but flowers much better when given a couple of hours of sun.

Iris cristata Powder Blue GiantIris cristata ‘Powder Blue Giant’ is incredibly floriferous in the garden today.  These spring flowering groundcovers are just delightful.

 

Epimediums on Parade in the Garden

Epimedium Songbirds3

What an incredible week for epimediums here at Juniper Level.  The first photo is our introduction, Epimedium ‘Songbirds‘…an insanely heavily flowered yellow selection.Epimedium wushanense Starlite flower closeup

Epimedium wushanense ‘Starlite‘ is our selection of the amazing Chinese species, which boasts large terminal inflorescences on a plant that approaches 2’ tall.Epimedium zhushanense3

 

 

Epimedium zhushanense is another incredible Chinese species with large bicolor, spider-like flowers.  We think these are truly stunning in the woodland garden.